A child’s growth is something that parents must really put their attention to. It is something that must monitor and focus on because learning is very important and crucial while children are still young. However, there are really some cases wherein children experience some problems or delays in their development whether it is social, emotional, or mental. Nevertheless, there are still ways in which this can be prevented or fixed. Early intervention is an important matter when it comes to this kind of matter.

One important thing that children learn while growing is reading and we also admit that children encounter some problems regarding this. That is why Stephanie Dunne will explain to us the importance of early reading intervention.

The Importance of Early Reading Intervention

Understanding reading development in young children can be tricky for parents who are not educators. When assessing their children’s reading skills, parents do not want to over-worry and be bothersome to the teacher when everything is fine, yet parents also do not want to be too lax and wait for things to get better if that’s not the right thing. Oh what is a parent to do?

First, know that there are set pre- and early-reading skills that children should master as early as preschool and kindergarten that, on the surface, may not seem like they have to do with reading at all. One of these important skills is called phonological awareness, which refers to a child’s ability to hear and manipulate sounds in oral language. It includes such skills as rhyming, clapping out syllables in words, and identifying the initial sounds in words, such as the sound for “m” in “monkey.”  

Proficient oral language skills are also key for reading comprehension. That is, children should have developed the ability to talk on time, have a wide vocabulary from communicating with the people around them, and have a compendium of background knowledge from experiences to pull from when trying to understand a book they are reading or that is being read to them. Read more here.

When it comes to reading, it is really important to supplement our child with advanced learning before letting them enter school. It would help them understand lessons faster because they already have knowledge about it beforehand.

In another case, let us see the importance of early intervention services that saved two kids who are in a different situation. Brittany Moore will tell us about it.

Early intervention therapy saves two local kids

TOPEKA, Kan. (KSNT) – Today, you wouldn’t know anything was ever wrong. But, when Janet Kelley adopted Lauryn and Jaxson, she found out their birth mother was a heavy drug user while pregnant.

My daughter was completely anti-social. Didn’t know how to look them in the eye, didn’t know how to talk to people. Nothing. Jackson had some serious behavioral issues. He was hitting people, breaking things.  In second grade the police were almost called on him twice.  It was absolutely devastating to see your child struggle like that and not know what to do,” said mom, Janet Kelley.

The behavioral issues were at times severe, sometimes too much for Janet to cope with alone. She decided it was time to get help. But making the first call, is not easy.

“It made me feel like if I have to ask for help then I am not a good parent, I am not doing the right thing and that is not acceptable,” said Kelley. Read more here.

            It is a good thing that Janet asked for help when she noticed that her children had some serious behavioral issues. Because of the therapies they went through, they were able to prevent what could’ve been worse and they were able to fix what is wrong.

Another situation which greatly affects the development of a child is autism and one thing we can do about it is early intervention. Katherine G. Hobbs will tell us the benefits of early intervention for children with autism.

Autism and the Benefits of Early Intervention

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), a rising percentage of the world population is being diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). As of 2014, an estimated 1 percent of the world population had an ASD, with the United States estimating 1 in 68 children or 3.5 million Americans living with ASD.

Research is increasingly proving that children with an ASD benefit from the earliest interventions possible. In 2001, the National Research Council urged families not to use the “wait and see” method for early intervention as it was “likely to have significant and negative consequences.”

Louise Kaczmarek, from the University of Pittsburgh School of Education, cites intervention strategies that have been most successful are those that “use a hybrid approach, integrating developmental and/or relationship-based techniques with those of applied behavior analysis (which focuses on applying the principles of learning).” These types of interventions are usually play-based and parent-facilitated. They typically occur “within the natural routines and activities of the child’s day.”

Early interventions can impact multiple areas of a child’s life including—but not limited to—their academic success, communication skills, and may alleviate fiscal responsibility for continuing therapies. Read more here.

One thing that early intervention improves in children with autism is speech which is very important especially in understanding and communicating with them. Also, early interventions could help families save money because early therapies could be done which could prevent further or more serious problems in the future. If you ever notice that there is something wrong the social, emotional, or mental development of your children, you should consider undergoing early interventions because it could help you and your child a lot in many ways.